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Rm 02, 5/F., Kai Seng Commerical Centre,
4-6 Hankow Road, TST Kln, HK
(near Kowloon Hotel)
Tel: (852) 3100 0555
Fax: (852) 3100 0556

Lawrence Chow / ENT Doctor

editor

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Oral Cancer: Questions to Ask Your ENT Doctor

Oral cancer is a type of cancer that affects the mouth. It can also develop inside your mouth on your tongue, gums, lips, and other parts of your mouth. Spreading to other parts of the body, oral cancers can be life-threatening.

You should see the ENT doctor for further diagnosis when there are some signs and symptoms of oral cancer. But what should I ask the Doctor about oral cancer?

Here list some common questions to be asked. Not all of these questions may apply to you, but asking the ones that do may be helpful.

 

When informed to have oral cancer:

  • What kind of oral cancer do I have?
  • Where is my cancer located?
  • Has my cancer spread beyond where it started?
  • What is the stage of my cancer and what does that mean?
  • Will I need other tests before we can decide on treatment?

 

When deciding on a treatment plan:

  • How much experience do you have treating this type of cancer?
  • What are my treatment options and why do you recommend to me?
  • What is the goal of the treatment?
  • Will this treatment affect the way I look?
  • Should I get a second opinion and how?
  • What are the chances I can be cured of this cancer with these treatment options?
  • How quickly do I need to decide on treatment?
  • What should I do to be ready for treatment?
  • How long will treatment last?
  • Will treatment affect my work?
  • What risks and side effects can I expect from the treatments?
  • What are my options if the treatment doesn’t work or if the cancer recurs?

 

During treatment

  • Is there anything I can do to help manage side effects?
  • What symptoms or side effects should I tell you about right away?
  • How can I reach you on nights or holidays?
  • Do I need to change what I eat during treatment?
  • Can I exercise during treatment and what kind?

 

After treatment:

  • Will I need a special diet?
  • Are there any limits on what I can do?
  • What symptoms should I watch for?
  • What kind of exercise should I do?
  • What type of follow-up will I need?
  • How often will I need to have follow-up exams and imaging tests?
  • How will I know if the cancer has come back?
  • What will my options be if the cancer recurs?
  • How can I reach you in an emergency?

 

Did you find the information useful? If so, continue reading our posts.

 

For details of our ENT services, diagnosis, and treatment, please consult our ENT specialist.

 

 

Source:

HK ENT Specialist Ltd.

Hong Kong based ENT clinic centre

For ENT Services, Audiology & Speech Therapy,

Sleep Disordered Breathing Management,

Hearing Aid Prescription & Medical Cosmetic Services

https://www.hkentspecialist.hk

Recovering from Oral Cancer – How to Cope?

Cancer is one of the most frightening words in the English language. It often conjures up images of death and pain, and people with cancer often face life-altering changes for many years to come. For many people with oral cancer, there is a long road ahead before recovering from the disease and getting back to their normal everyday lives.

 

The types of treatment available

There are many types of treatment for oral cancer. The goal of most treatments is to destroy or remove the tumor or cancerous tissue. It may take years of treatment before the cancer goes away completely. There are also some treatments that can kill cancer cells without removing them from the body. These treatments are called “chemotherapy” and they include radiation therapy, immunotherapy, and hormone therapy.

 

What should I expect at each stage of treatment?

The first stage of treatment is surgery. If the cancer has not spread beyond the base of tongue, it will be completely removed. If the tumor is in the glands of the neck, they may be removed as well.

The second stage is removing lymph nodes that are suspected to have cancerous cells. This stage will also include chemotherapy which can be given orally or through an intravenous needle. Radiation may also be given which kills any remaining tumor cells.

The third stage of treatment is supportive care. This includes things like medication to help with side effects and vitamins to make sure you are getting your daily nutrients due to loss in appetite or nausea from chemo treatments.

 

When can I start to live a normal life again?

It really depends on what you mean by “normal.” If you’re able to eat normal foods and go about your day without feeling like you’re living in pain, then yes, you can live a normal life. But if you’ve had radiation treatments or need to take medication for an extended period of time, it may be difficult to find normal. Seek help from loved ones and professionals to find out what’s best for your situation.

 

How long will the recovery process take?

It is impossible to predict how long the recovery process will take. It could be anywhere from weeks to months. The length of the process depends on various factors, such as the severity of the cancer, whether or not there were any complications during treatment, and if you had radiation therapy.

 

Tips for managing life during recovery

Although there are some days in the rough periods, it’s important to try to focus on doing things that give you pleasure and will help you heal.

 

Did you find the information useful? If so, continue reading our posts.

 

For details of our ENT services, diagnosis, and treatment, please consult our ENT specialist.

 

 

Source:

HK ENT Specialist Ltd.

Hong Kong based ENT clinic centre

For ENT Services, Audiology & Speech Therapy,

Sleep Disordered Breathing Management,

Hearing Aid Prescription & Medical Cosmetic Services

https://www.hkentspecialist.hk

Understanding Oral Cancer

Oral cancer is a disease that develops on the lining of the mouth or throat. It starts as small lumps called papillomas. Oral cancer is broadly classified into two types – squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. Depending on the type, it can also develop inside your mouth on your tongue, gums, lips, and other parts of your mouth. Early detection is vital because oral cancer can be deadly if it is not treated early on. Here take a look on the causes, risk factors, symptoms, and its treatment.

 

The Causes of Oral Cancer

The causes of oral cancer can be classified as such:

– Asbestos: Exposure to asbestos is the most common cause of mesothelioma, which has been linked to oral cancer.

– HPV: A virus, known as human papillomavirus, can cause oral cancers. It is mostly passed through sexual contact and through oral sex with another person who has the virus.

– Tobacco: Smoking increases your chances of developing oral cancer because tobacco smoke contains carcinogens.

– Alcohol: Drinking alcohol reduces the risk of developing most cancers, but it enhances the risks for people who drink more than 5 drinks every day.

 

Risk Factors for Oral Cancer

There are many risk factors for oral cancer. The most common is smoking, but there are also many others. They include chewing tobacco, alcohol consumption, HPV infection, and family history. Another thing that increases the risk is the duration of exposure to ultraviolet light from natural or artificial sources.

 

Who is Likely to Get Oral Cancer?

According to Oral Cancer Awareness Month, adults who smoke and drink alcohol are more likely to get oral cancer. Those who work in professions with a higher risk of exposure to carcinogens, such as miners and painters, can also be at an increased risk for developing the disease.

 

Symptoms of Oral Cancer

The symptoms of oral cancer are not always clear, which is why it’s important to see a ENT doctor if you have any concerns. The most common symptoms of oral cancer include a lump or sore that does not heal within two weeks, difficulty swallowing, pain when chewing or talking, and a loose tooth.

 

Treatments for Oral Cancer

The most common treatments for oral cancer are surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy. The type of treatment recommended is based on the stage of the cancer. Typically, people are given a combination of these treatments because not one treatment will work by itself to cure or control oral cancer.

 

Did you find the information useful? If so, continue reading our posts.

 

For details of our ENT services, diagnosis, and treatment, please consult our ENT specialist.

 

 

Source:

HK ENT Specialist Ltd.

Hong Kong based ENT clinic centre

For ENT Services, Audiology & Speech Therapy,

Sleep Disordered Breathing Management,

Hearing Aid Prescription & Medical Cosmetic Services

https://www.hkentspecialist.hk

Lip Cancer: Potential Complications And Its Prevention

Lip cancer is a type of oral cancer which develops in thin and flat cells that line the lips, mouth, tongue, cheeks, sinuses, throat, hard and soft palates.

Although lip cancer is highly curable when diagnosed early, people previously with lip cancer have an increased chance of developing a second cancer in the head, neck, or mouth. Moreover, there are many potential complications of lip cancer.

 

What are potential complications?

  • Cancer Spread. A lip tumor can spread to other areas of the mouth and tongue as well as distant parts of the body if left untreated. It becomes much more difficult to cure if the cancer spreads.
  • Functional and cosmetic consequences. People may experience trouble with speech, chewing, and swallowing after the surgery to remove large tumors on their lips.
  • Disfigurement of the lip and face due to surgery. This may be the problem caused after surgery. Reconstructive or cosmetic surgeons can rebuild the bones and tissues of the face.
  • Other side effects of chemotherapy and radiation. They include hair loss, weakness and fatigue, poor appetite, nausea, vomiting, numbness in the hands and feet, severe anemia, weight loss, dry skin, sore throat, change in taste, infection, and oral mucositis, etc.

 

Prevention is better than cure. Hence, it’s important to know what your risk factors are in order to prevent it or detect it early on if you do develop symptoms.

 

What are the symptoms of lip cancer?

Signs and symptoms of lip cancer include:

  • a sore, lesion, blister, ulcer, or lump on the mouth that doesn’t go away
  • a red or white patch on the lip
  • bleeding or pain on the lips
  • swelling of the jaw

However, it doesn’t necessarily mean you have lip cancer if you have a sore or lump on your lips. Discuss any symptoms with your ENT doctor.

 

Who’s more likely to have lip cancer?

Your behaviors and lifestyle heavily influence your risk for lip cancer. There are some risk factors that may increase your risk for lip cancer. They include:

  • tobacco use
  • heavy alcohol use
  • prolonged exposure to direct sunlight
  • having light-colored skin
  • being male
  • having human papillomavirus (HPV)
  • being older than 40 years of age

Prevention of lip cancer

You can reduce your risk of lip cancer by avoiding activities leading to lip cancer, and by taking care of your mouth. They include:

  • avoid using tobacco
  • avoid drinking excessive alcohol
  • limit exposure to both natural and artificial sunlight
  • get a full course of the HPV vaccine
  • see your dentist regularly

 

Did you find the information useful? If so, continue reading our posts.

 

For details of our ENT services, diagnosis, and treatment, please consult our ENT specialist.

 

 

Source:

HK ENT Specialist Ltd.

Hong Kong based ENT clinic centre

For ENT Services, Audiology & Speech Therapy,

Sleep Disordered Breathing Management,

Hearing Aid Prescription & Medical Cosmetic Services

https://www.hkentspecialist.hk

Lip Cancer: Diagnosis And Treatments

Lip cancer is a type of head and neck cancer that develops from abnormal cells to form lesions or tumors on the lips. Some studies show that lip cancer is linked to the use of tobacco and heavy alcohol. People working outdoors are also more likely to have lip cancer.

As the lips are prominent and visible, lesions can be seen and felt easily. This allows for early diagnosis. Hence, the chance of survival after treatment is greater than 90%. This article will discuss the diagnosis and treatment of lip cancer.

 

Diagnosis of Lip Cancer

As early diagnosis is important, consult your ENT doctor as soon as possible if you have signs or symptoms. The doctor will perform a physical examination of your lips and other parts of your mouth to identify the abnormal areas and possible causes.

Then, the doctor will take a medical history and ask specific questions about your:

  • health history
  • smoking and alcohol history
  • past illnesses
  • medical and dental treatments
  • family history of disease
  • any medications you are using

 

If lip cancer is suspected, it requires a biopsy and a small sample of tissue that is removed from a tumor to diagnose cancer. Then, a pathologist will examine the cells under a microscope. If the biopsy results confirm that you have lip cancer, several tests are used to aid in the diagnosis to determine how far the cancer has progressed, or if it’s spread to other parts of the body.

 

Tests may include:

  • CT scan
  • MRI scan
  • PET scan
  • chest X-ray
  • complete blood count (CBC)
  • endoscopy

 

Treatment of lip cancer

Surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy are some of the treatments available for lip cancer. Other possible options include targeted therapy and investigative treatments, such as immunotherapy and gene therapy.

As with other cancers, treatment depends on the stage of the cancer, how far it’s progressed and your general health. If the tumor is small, surgery will be performed to remove it. This involves removal of all tissue involved with the cancer, plus reconstruction of the lip (cosmetically and functionally).

If the tumor is larger or at a later stage, radiation and chemotherapy may be used to shrink the tumor before or after surgery to lower the risk of recurrence. Chemotherapy treatments deliver drugs throughout the body and reduce the risk of the cancer spreading or returning.

 

Did you find the information useful? If so, continue reading our posts.

 

For details of our ENT services, diagnosis, and treatment, please consult our ENT specialist.

 

 

Source:

HK ENT Specialist Ltd.

Hong Kong based ENT clinic centre

For ENT Services, Audiology & Speech Therapy,

Sleep Disordered Breathing Management,

Hearing Aid Prescription & Medical Cosmetic Services

https://www.hkentspecialist.hk

Tongue Cancers: Can It Be Prevented?

Tongue cancer is a type of head and neck cancer that affects the tongue. This type of cancer occurs when there is an abnormal growth of cells on the surface or inside the tissue that lines part of the mouth, which includes the skin inside the mouth, gums, and lining of the mouth.

The five-year relative survival rate for tongue cancer depends on its stage. If the cancer has not spread beyond the tongue, the five-year relative survival rate is 78%. If the cancer has only spread locally to lymph nodes in the neck, the relative survival rate is about 63%. If it has spread far, the five-year relative survival rate is about 36%. It is clear that the tongue cancer can be treated with early diagnosis.

 

Be sure to watch out for symptoms such as the following:

Symptoms of tongue cancer may include pain, difficulty swallowing, or red patches in the white part of the mouth. It usually takes years for these symptoms to appear, which is why it’s important to be aware of them and discuss them with your ENT doctor when they do.

Prevention is better than cure. Hence, it’s important to know what your risk factors are in order to prevent it or detect it early on if you do develop symptoms.

 

What causes the tongue cancer and who’s at risk?

The following behaviors and conditions can increase your risk of the tongue cancer:

  • smoking or chewing tobacco
  • heavy drinking
  • being infected with human papillomavirus (HPV)
  • chewing betel
  • family history of tongue or other mouth cancers
  • personal history of certain cancers, such as other squamous cell cancers
  • poor diet low in fruits and vegetables
  • constant irritation from jagged teeth or ill-fitting dentures

Tongue cancers are most common in people over 55 years old.

Prevention of tongue cancer

You can reduce your risk of tongue cancer by avoiding activities leading to tongue cancer, and by taking care of your mouth. They include:

  • stop using tobacco
  • avoid drinking excessive alcohol
  • don’t chew betel
  • get a full course of the HPV vaccine
  • avoid oral sex
  • include lots of fruits and vegetables in your diet
  • make sure brushing your teeth daily and floss regularly
  • see your dentist regularly

 

Did you find the information useful? If so, continue reading our ENT posts.

 

For details of our ENT services, diagnosis, and treatment, please consult our ENT specialist.

 

 

Source:

HK ENT Specialist Ltd.

Hong Kong based ENT clinic centre

For ENT Services, Audiology & Speech Therapy,

Sleep Disordered Breathing Management,

Hearing Aid Prescription & Medical Cosmetic Services

https://www.hkentspecialist.hk

Tongue Cancers: Diagnosis and Consultation Guide

Tongue cancer is a rare type of cancer that affects the tongue. Symptoms of tongue cancer may include pain, difficulty swallowing, or red patches in the white part of the mouth. It usually takes years for these symptoms to appear, which is why it’s important to be aware of them and discuss them with your ENT doctor when they do. If you have any of these symptoms, or notice any white or red patches in your mouth, it’s important to go to the doctor right away.

 

How do Doctor Diagnose Tongue Cancer?

Tongue cancers can be a result of a person’s genetic makeup, infections from HPV or HSV, a tobacco user, a poor immune system, uncontrolled diabetes and even alcohol consumption, etc.

Hence, the ENT doctor will take a medical history and ask specific questions about symptoms to make a diagnosis. A patient’s tongue and neck will be examined and a small, long-handled mirror will be used to look down the throat. There are several tests to be done.

It is generally diagnosed through a biopsy, which usually involves a doctor sticking a thin needle into the tumor. During this process, the doctor will try to remove as much tissue as possible. If the doctor thinks that it’s difficult to remove more tissue, they may have to take more samples from different areas on the tongue. This is called a surgical biopsy. They may also do a biopsy by injecting material into the tumor or cutting out a small piece of it and then looking at it under a microscope.

Another way doctors diagnose tongue cancer is through imaging scans such as X-rays, computed tomography (CT) scans, or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These scans can show how deep the tumor goes

 

Consultation Tips to help you get the most

  1. Remember the reason for your visit
  2. Write down questions you want answered before your visit
  3. Bring someone with you to help you ask questions and remember what your doctor tells you
  4. Write down the name of a new diagnosis, and any new medicines, treatments, or tests, any new instructions from your doctor
  5. Know why a new medicine or treatment is prescribed, and its side effects
  6. Ask if your condition can be treated in other ways
  7. Know why a test or procedure is recommended and what the results could mean
  8. Know what to expect if you do not take the medicine or test
  9. Write down the date, time, and purpose for a follow-up appointment if any
  10. Know how to contact your doctor for further questions

 

Did you find the information useful? If so, continue reading our ENT posts.

 

For details of our ENT services, diagnosis, and treatment, please consult our ENT specialist.

 

 

Source:

HK ENT Specialist Ltd.

Hong Kong based ENT clinic centre

For ENT Services, Audiology & Speech Therapy,

Sleep Disordered Breathing Management,

Hearing Aid Prescription & Medical Cosmetic Services

https://www.hkentspecialist.hk

A Guide To The Stages Of Tongue Cancer And Treatments

Tongue cancer is a form of cancer that starts in the cells near your tongue. This type of cancer is often caused by smoking or chewing tobacco but it can happen to anyone. It’s more common in males than females. The two most common types of tongue cancers are squamous cell carcinoma and verrucous carcinoma. It is sometimes found as a result from human papilloma virus, which can be contagious through bodily fluids or skin contact with a person who has it. There are also people who have an increased risk for developing this cancer due to hereditary factors.

 

How is Tongue Cancer Treated?

Tongue cancer is typically treated with surgery to remove cancerous tissue. If the cancer has grown deep into the mouth, it may require cutting part of the tongue or jawbone to get all of the tumor. Chemotherapy and radiation therapy are also two main types of treatment for people with advanced cancers.

 

Understanding the Stages of Tongue Cancer

Tongue cancer is a type of cancer that starts in the lining of the mouth or throat. It can also spread to lymph nodes, cervical glands, and other parts of the body. There are 4 stages of tongue cancer:

  • Stage 0 (in situ): The cancer is not present in the cells but is only in the basement membrane, the connective tissue that surrounds them;
  • Stage I: The cancer has grown into the tissues around it and may be in one to two layers deep in the tongue;
  • Stage II: The cancer has grown into three or more layers in depth in the tongue and may have grown into surrounding tissues;
  • Stage III: The cancer has grown through three or more layers and has spread to organs such as lymph nodes or muscles around your head.

 

Treatment Options for Stage 1, 2 and 3 Tongue Cancer

Treatment options for stage 1, 2 and 3 tongue cancer are determined by the number of lymph nodes affected. For stage 2, 2-3 lymph nodes should be removed while for stage 3, all lymph nodes should be removed.

 

Treatment Options for Stage 4 Tongue Cancer

The tongue is made up of tissues that secrete fluids or food. The cancer cells can invade these tissues to form a tumor that blocks the ability to swallow or breathe. Stage 4 patients are likely to experience bleeding in the mouth, difficulty swallowing, and pain. Treatment options for this stage include:

  1. surgery,
  2. radiation therapy,
  3. chemotherapy,
  4. palliative care (lifestyle changes),
  5. clinical trials (experimental drugs).

 

Side Effects Of Surgical Removal Of Tongue Cancer

The side effects of surgical removal of tongue cancer can vary depending on the extent and location of the cancer. For some people, speech therapy and physical therapy may be prescribed to help with swallowing and speaking after surgery.

 

Conclusion

In conclusion, the study found that if a person is diagnosed with tongue cancer and they go through radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and surgery, their chances of surviving are much higher. There are many treatments for tongue cancer, but the best way to treat it is prevention. Be careful about what you eat, drink, and smoke. Minimize your contact with chemicals and radiation.

 

Did you find the information useful? If so, continue reading our ENT posts.

 

For details of our ENT services, diagnosis, and treatment, please consult our ENT specialist.

 

Source:

HK ENT Specialist Ltd.

Hong Kong based ENT clinic centre

For ENT Services, Audiology & Speech Therapy,

Sleep Disordered Breathing Management,

Hearing Aid Prescription & Medical Cosmetic Services

https://www.hkentspecialist.hk

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